LAWSUIT FILED FOR WOMAN WHO BLED TO DEATH FROM PRADAXA

A wrongful death lawsuit has been filed against Boehringer Ingelheim on behalf of a woman who bled to death, it is alleged from the side affects of Pradaxa a drug used to prevent strokes among individuals with atrial fribrillation. The medication was promoted as better than warfarin because it needs less monitoring but Pradaxa does not have a reversal agent that can be used to quickly stop bleeding that may develop. With Warfarin, doctors can give patients a heavy dose of Vitamin K if bleeding pccurs. No such antidote is available for Pradaxa. The lawsuit says that Gertrude Eubanks began to bleed internally within days from when she began taking the drug. The doctors were unable to halt the bleeding. In recent months, hundreds of adverse event reports have been filed with the FDA involving hemorrhages and internal bleeding which may have caused many users to bleed to death. At least 505 instances involving Pradaxa bleeding events were reported according to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Sales as of February exceeded $1 billion nontheless. Pradaxa is an oral anticoagulant and is a direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI). In a recently released study in Germany, researchers found a higher risk of intracranial bleeding associated with Pradaxa compared with Warfarin.

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2 responses to “LAWSUIT FILED FOR WOMAN WHO BLED TO DEATH FROM PRADAXA”

  1. On Dec. 7, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that it had began a formal investigation into the 260 reports of fatal Pradaxa® injuries that occurred from March 2008 to October 2011 (a period of approx. 3-1/2 years).

    Symptoms of bleeding, one of the many adverse Pradaxa® side effects preceded many of the deaths linked to this anticoagulant drug. The FDA said it will be conducting the investigation to determine if the incidence of bleeding and deaths among patients prescribed Pradaxa® is higher than what would be expected based on observations in the clinical trial that was held before the FDA approved Pradaxa® (dabigatran)

  2. Good post. Thanks…